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  • Linked servers: how long do they stay connected?

    I was looking at some of my old notes on linked servers and found a tidbit on how the linked server connections are managed by SQL Server. I'm posting it here because I don’t think the information is widely known. When you make a linked server call from a SQL Server instance (say ServerA) to another SQL Server instance (say ServerB) over ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on March 31, 2011
  • Database Testing Links

    Yesterday at the SQL PASS 2010 Summit I did a presentation on database testing - I have two sets of links I mentioned there, one for the information I presented and the other for various tools I've tried. Enjoy: More information on Database Testing and Testing ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on November 10, 2010
  • SQL Server Backup Simulator

    The SQL Server support team just announced the release of a backup simulator. Many 3rd party utilities that do backup like IBM Tivoli, Symantec BackupExec, Quest Litespeed, Redgate SQL Backup etc. use the sqlvdi.dll to communicate to SQL Server and this allows you to simulate that activity. So if you want to test how your system reacts or more ...
    Posted to Andrew Kelly (Weblog) by Andrew Kelly on October 28, 2010
  • Killing a SQL Server thread? Don’t!

    Sometimes, when you kill a session (i.e. a spid) in a SQL Server instance, the spid just refuses to go away not because it’s doing a rollback. Perhaps, it’s stuck on a certain dependency on something external to SQL Server or it’s just simply stuck for some decipherable reasons. And the spid may hang around for as long as the instance is online ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on February 4, 2010
  • Attaching a Database

    I had someone ask me yesterday how they could get to a database used by a product that they owned, but that was installed using SQL Server Express. They didn’t have access to the database, and they didn’t know the password for the service that started Express, so they wanted to know if they could look at the data. There are a few ways to do ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on January 26, 2010
  • Spit it out already!

    You’ve probably seen that commercial where the chewing-gum company van stalks the guy who has been chewing the same piece of gum too long, and they attack him and make him chew another piece. I feel like that with SQL Server 2000. Almost every shop I go into has at least one primary application running on SQL Server 2000. Now, don’t get me wrong ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on January 6, 2010
  • After the Upgrade, it runs differently…

    I got a question yesterday in the mail that I thought I would just answer here in a broad context. While I can’t troubleshoot or do performance tuning from a distance, there are some interesting concepts and suggestions this e-mail brings up: “I have recently seen a change from SQL Server from 2005 to 2008 in where it handles CASE statements ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on December 1, 2009
  • Performance impact: memory effectiveness of virtualization

    One of the key performance metrics on any computer system is its memory speed (or memory bandwidth).   Memory speed can be measured in many different ways at different levels. At the OS level, one way to measure memory speed is to clock how fast (in terms of megabytes/gigabytes per second) it can read a piece of data from a memory location ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on July 29, 2009
  • T-SQL Exercise: Simplest data-loading script to produce worst query performance – May 29th Update

    This is another follow-up on the T-SQL exercise.   So the test query below is rather simple:   DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS go SELECT COUNT(*) FROM dbo.test;   But beneath its simple appearance, many factors are at play and interact in a complex way to influence the query performance. In other words, trying to predict its ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on May 29, 2009
  • Performance impact: thread mode vs. fiber mode

    SQL Server can run in one of two modes: thread mode or fiber mode. By default, SQL Server runs in thread mode in which a SQL Server worker is associated with a Windows thread throughout all phases of its execution. This can be changed with the sp_configure option ‘Lightweight Pooling’. When Lightweight Pooling is turned on, SQL Server runs in ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on May 4, 2009
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