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Showing page 2 of 2 (18 total posts)
  • Probe Residual when you have a Hash Match – a hidden cost in execution plans

    No, this post has nothing to do with airport security, and nothing to do with marijuana. Being honest, this post is only half about Hash Matches and Probe Residuals. It’s more about the types of predicates you can see mentioned in a SQL Server Execution Plan (or Query Plan, but I prefer to call them Execution Plans) – but you may well see some ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on March 21, 2011
  • The blocking nature of aggregates

    I wrote a post recently about how query tuning isn’t just about how quickly the query runs – that if you have something (such as SSIS) that is consuming your data (and probably introducing a bottleneck), then it might be more important to have a query which focuses on getting the first bit of data out. You can read that post here.  In ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on March 7, 2011
  • The SSIS tuning tip that everyone misses

    I know that everyone misses this, because I’m yet to find someone who doesn’t have a bit of an epiphany when I describe this. When tuning Data Flows in SQL Server Integration Services, people see the Data Flow as moving from the Source to the Destination, passing through a number of transformations. What people don’t consider is the Source, ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on February 17, 2011
  • Try-N-Save SSIS Packages

    The Try-N-Save SSIS Packages from my SSIS Dimensional Data Optimization presentation are available at http://cid-8f7e6c950afc6b3e.office.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/Presentation/TryNSave.zip. I'm still working on getting the sample database uploaded - even compressed a backup is larger than SkyDrive's upload filesize limit. I'll script it out when ...
    Posted to Michael Coles: Sergeant SQL (Weblog) by Mike C on November 29, 2010
  • Inverse Predicates - look both ways before you cross

    When I’m at the PASS Summit in Seattle this week, I will need to remember that I can’t just step onto the road if I’m walking along the footpath on the right-hand side. In the UK and Australia, where we drive the correct side, it’s fine (just don’t tell my kids), because the cars that are nearest me are coming towards me – except of course, the ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on November 8, 2010
  • Table? No such thing…

    No really – hear me out. Of course you create tables, and you query tables, and we say that data is stored in tables. The table is (rightly) a fundamental part of relational theory. But I find that when I think about queries and how they run, I need to approach the system thinking about the indexes that I’m querying, not the tables. When you ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on September 13, 2010
  • Spatial data from shapefiles (for T-SQL Tuesday #006)

    I’m giving a presentation on May 12th at the Adelaide .Net User Group, around the topic of spatial data, and in particular, the visualization of said data. Given that it’s about one the larger types, this post should also count towards Michael Coles’ T-SQL Tuesday on BLOB data. I wrote recently about my experience with exploded data, but what I ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on May 10, 2010
  • T-SQL Tuesday - Query Cost

    In SQL Server, the cost of a particular plans is based largely on I/O, which makes this post a good candidate for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by Mike Walsh who, like me, walks a straight path. In considering I/O – the movement of data generally In and Out of disk and memory – my thoughts come very much to query cost. If I run set ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on March 8, 2010
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