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Showing page 2 of 2 (15 total posts)
  • Table? No such thing…

    No really – hear me out. Of course you create tables, and you query tables, and we say that data is stored in tables. The table is (rightly) a fundamental part of relational theory. But I find that when I think about queries and how they run, I need to approach the system thinking about the indexes that I’m querying, not the tables. When you ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on September 13, 2010
  • Spatial data from shapefiles (for T-SQL Tuesday #006)

    I’m giving a presentation on May 12th at the Adelaide .Net User Group, around the topic of spatial data, and in particular, the visualization of said data. Given that it’s about one the larger types, this post should also count towards Michael Coles’ T-SQL Tuesday on BLOB data. I wrote recently about my experience with exploded data, but what I ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on May 10, 2010
  • T-SQL Tuesday #4: I/O, You Know

    It's time for the fourth T-SQL Tuesday, managed this time by Mike Walsh. I almost missed this deadline completely, since I didn't see the announcement at all. I wrote to Adam to ask if there even was an event this month, since I wasn't able to get into my own blog site (www.SQLBlog.com) for a week, and he pointed me to Mike's site. I'm wondering ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on March 9, 2010
  • T-SQL Tuesday - Query Cost

    In SQL Server, the cost of a particular plans is based largely on I/O, which makes this post a good candidate for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by Mike Walsh who, like me, walks a straight path. In considering I/O – the movement of data generally In and Out of disk and memory – my thoughts come very much to query cost. If I run set ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on March 8, 2010
  • T-SQL Tuesday #001: Exploring "Fuzzy" Interval Islands Using SQLCLR

    When working with time intervals, we often want to ask a couple of basic questions: Which time periods are not covered by our intervals? These are known as ''gaps''. What are the time ranges that we are fully covering? These are known as ''islands''. If you're unfamiliar with ''gaps'' and ''islands'' I highly recommend reading some ...
    Posted to Adam Machanic (Weblog) by Adam Machanic on December 8, 2009
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