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  • SSIS Lookup transformation in T-SQL

    There is no equivalent to the SSIS Lookup transformation in T-SQL – but there is a workaround if you’re careful. The big issue that you face is about the number of rows that you connect to in the Lookup. SQL Books Online (BOL) says: If there is no matching entry in the reference dataset, no join occurs. By default, the Lookup transformation ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on July 8, 2014
  • SQL 2014 does data the way developers want

    A post I’ve been meaning to write for a while, good that it fits with this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by Joey D’Antoni (@jdanton) Ever since I got into databases, I’ve been a fan. I studied Pure Maths at university (as well as Computer Science), and am very comfortable with Set Theory, which undergirds relational database concepts. But I’ve ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on June 9, 2014
  • When is a SQL function not a function?

    Should SQL Server even have functions? (Oh yeah – this is a T-SQL Tuesday post, hosted this month by Brad Schulz) Functions serve an important part of programming, in almost any language. A function is a piece of code that is designed to return something, as opposed to a piece of code which isn’t designed to return anything (which is known as a ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on November 7, 2011
  • Joins without JOIN

    I’m now doing two sessions at the SQL Saturday event in Portland. I had been scheduled to do a single session (on indexes), but got an email yesterday asking if I could do another one as well. So now I’m going to do a session earlier in the day about Joins. Yes, JOINs. Nice co-incidence to find that this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by Stuart ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on October 3, 2011
  • My biggest recommendation for people learning T-SQL

    It’s not quite a Best Practice, but it’s something that I see as very important. It makes the difference between someone who might be quite good at T-SQL, and someone who can go past the rest and become one of those people who get asked to solve other people’s T-SQL problems. It’s easy – you read the plans. You see, the plans explain to you ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on July 11, 2011
  • The blocking nature of aggregates

    I wrote a post recently about how query tuning isn’t just about how quickly the query runs – that if you have something (such as SSIS) that is consuming your data (and probably introducing a bottleneck), then it might be more important to have a query which focuses on getting the first bit of data out. You can read that post here.  In ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on March 7, 2011
  • Table? No such thing…

    No really – hear me out. Of course you create tables, and you query tables, and we say that data is stored in tables. The table is (rightly) a fundamental part of relational theory. But I find that when I think about queries and how they run, I need to approach the system thinking about the indexes that I’m querying, not the tables. When you ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on September 13, 2010
  • Spatial data from shapefiles (for T-SQL Tuesday #006)

    I’m giving a presentation on May 12th at the Adelaide .Net User Group, around the topic of spatial data, and in particular, the visualization of said data. Given that it’s about one the larger types, this post should also count towards Michael Coles’ T-SQL Tuesday on BLOB data. I wrote recently about my experience with exploded data, but what I ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on May 10, 2010
  • T-SQL Tuesday - Query Cost

    In SQL Server, the cost of a particular plans is based largely on I/O, which makes this post a good candidate for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by Mike Walsh who, like me, walks a straight path. In considering I/O – the movement of data generally In and Out of disk and memory – my thoughts come very much to query cost. If I run set ...
    Posted to Rob Farley (Weblog) by rob_farley on March 8, 2010
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