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  • Big Data and the Cloud - More Hype or a Real Workload?

    Last week Microsoft announced several new offerings for “Big Data” - and since I’m a stickler for definitions, I wanted to make sure I understood what that really means. What is “Big Data”? What size hard drive is that? After all, my laptop has 1TB of storage - is my laptop “Big Data”? There are actually a few definitions for this term, most ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on October 18, 2011
  • You Probably Already Have a “Private Cloud”

    I’ve mentioned before that I’m not a fan of the word “Cloud”. It’s too marketing-oriented, gimmicky and non-specific. A better definition (in many cases) is “Distributed Computing”. That means that some or all of the computing functions are handled somewhere other than under your specific control. But there is a current use of the word “Cloud” ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on June 14, 2011
  • Do you have a data roadmap?

    I often visit companies where they asked me “What is SQL Server’s Roadmap?” What they mean is that they want to know where Microsoft is going with our database products. I explain that we’re expanding not only the capacities in SQL Server but the capabilities – we’re trying to make an “information platform”, rather than just a data store. But ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on May 13, 2010
  • SQL Server for the Oracle DBA Links

    I do a presentation (and a class) called ''SQL Server for the Oracle DBA''. It's a non-marketing overview that gives you the basics of working with SQL Server if you're already familiar wtih how Oracle works. This class and these links DO NOT help you with ''Why should I use Oracle/SQL Server instead of Oracle/SQL Server'' - I'll assume you're ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on April 28, 2010
  • How Does Microsoft Do IT?

    Microsoft is a big company – and of course we have a lot of IT infrastructure that we have to manage. It might surprise you to learn that we have an IT group, just like at your company. We have a networking team, a server hardware team, software teams, DBA’s, the whole bit. In fact, we have more Mac computers than just about anyone (other than ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on February 3, 2010
  • Tools and Processes for “Fitting it all in”

    Most data professionals I’ve met work in two modes: we plan for our day, and we react to the situations around us. I’m staring at my list of things that I need to do today right now, which is my planned work. Of course, I have no idea how much of that will really get done – it’s optimistic to be sure. On the other hand I have several systems I ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on January 18, 2010
  • Know Your Product Specifications

    As the Data Professional in your organization, the rest of the org looks to you to ensure that the system can handle what the business requires. To do that, you need to know two things: what the business requires, and what SQL Server can do. But of course there’s a bit more to it than that. Knowing the business side of the requirements – well, I ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on January 13, 2010
  • Aren’t DBA’s Just System Admins for Databases?

    Last week I ran into an argument I’ve had since I left the mainframe space decades ago. A developer told me “DBA’s don’t design databases.” The inference was that DBA’s (i.e., Database Administrators) only worry about hardware, security, OS, database backups, things like that. He seemed amazed that a DBA would ever do “data” work. It may be the ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on November 30, 2009
  • Changing the Primary Key After You Have Data

    Yesterday I blogged about changing a Primary Key (PK) during the design phase, and before you have data in the database. Even then, it’s not trivial to change the data type or column(s) that make(s) up the PK. When you have data in that Primary Key and/or you have Foreign Keys (FK) that point to a PK field, this becomes a much more involved ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on November 24, 2009
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