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  • More Tables or More Databases?

    I got an e-mail from someone that has an interesting situation. He has 15,000 customers, and he asks if he should have a database for their data per customer. Without a LOT more data it’s impossible to say, of course, but there are some general concepts to keep in mind. Whenever you’re segmenting data, it’s all about boundary choices. You have ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on May 19, 2010
  • Use Those Schemas, People!

    Database Schemas are just containers – they aren’t users or anything else – think of a sub-directory on the hard drive. In early versions of SQL Server we “hid” schemas, placing all objects under “dbo”, which gave the erroneous perception that Schemas are users. In SQL Server 2005, we “un-hid” or re-introduced schemas within the database. Users ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on May 18, 2010
  • It’s OK to take a Shortcut Sometimes

    I was working this weekend with a fairly simple Excel spreadsheet, and I had to decompose one cell in it out to three columns in a SQL Server table. There are tools within SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) that should be able to do that, but I just couldn’t find my way around them properly. I’m not as familiar with SSIS as I would like to be ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on March 8, 2010
  • Code that Writes Code - A Good Idea or Not?

    I’m a big fan of code that writes code – most of the time. For instance, whenever you use the “templates” feature in SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) or the Maintenance Wizard, you’re using code that writes other code. There’s even a trick of writing Transact-SQL (T-SQL) code that in turn creates other code. But there is a class of code ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on February 16, 2010
  • Data Design

    I give series of classes and presentations on Data Design. I say “data” design instead of “database” design because we should consider more than just the database. Data might actually be stored in non-relational stores, such as Excel or XML files, and it might also be located in remote data stores like “cloud” technologies.   Here are the ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on February 2, 2010
  • Tools and Processes for “Fitting it all in”

    Most data professionals I’ve met work in two modes: we plan for our day, and we react to the situations around us. I’m staring at my list of things that I need to do today right now, which is my planned work. Of course, I have no idea how much of that will really get done – it’s optimistic to be sure. On the other hand I have several systems I ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on January 18, 2010
  • Know Your Product Specifications

    As the Data Professional in your organization, the rest of the org looks to you to ensure that the system can handle what the business requires. To do that, you need to know two things: what the business requires, and what SQL Server can do. But of course there’s a bit more to it than that. Knowing the business side of the requirements – well, I ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on January 13, 2010
  • It’s Data Tier Application and Data Application Component

    OK – In SQL Server 2008 R2 we did “re-use” an acronym or two (DAC and DTA), but it’s important to remember there are actually two parts to this new feature. One is the Data Application Component (DAC) and the other is the Data Tier Application (DTA). The DAC is the file created for a DTA. In SQL Server 2008R2 and Visual Studio you’ll find there ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on December 23, 2009
  • The Top 20 Questions in Database Design

    I'm still re-reading the ''Fourth Paradigm'' book by Microsoft Research, and one section continues to intrigues me. There's a part where the book explains database design, and puts forth that the most important thing when you're designing large data sets is to find out the ''Top Twenty Questions'' the database has to answer. The quote is ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on December 17, 2009
  • The Coming Database Design Wave

    Database design has been on my mind as of late – I’ve been teaching it in class, and I have a friend from Twitter that has a couple of questions. In fact, I think I’ll actually do a submission to PASS this year on this topic.   Don’t think it has to do with you? Well, I’m seeing a new “wave” of design options coming at the data ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on December 16, 2009
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