THE SQL Server Blog Spot on the Web

Welcome to SQLblog.com - The SQL Server blog spot on the web Sign in | |
in Search

Browse by Tags

All Tags » Best Practices » DBA » Security   (RSS)
  • Third Party Applications and Other Acts of Violence Against Your SQL Server

    I just got finished reading a great blog post from my buddy, Thomas LaRock (t | b), in which he describes a useful personal policy he used to track changes made to his SQL Servers when installing third-party products. Note that I'm talking about line-of-business applications here - your inventory management systems and help desk ...
    Posted to Kevin Kline (Weblog) by KKline on August 12, 2014
  • More than one way to skin an Audit

    I get asked quite a bit about auditing in SQL Server. By ''audit'', people mean everything from tracking logins to finding out exactly who ran a particular SELECT statement. In the really early versions of SQL Server, we didn't have a great story for very granular audits, so lots of workarounds were suggested. As time progressed, more and more ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on May 20, 2010
  • Backup those keys, citizen

    Periodically I back up the keys within my servers and databases, and when I do, I blog a reminder here. This should be part of your standard backup rotation – the keys should be backed up often enough to have at hand and again when they change. The first key you need to back up is the Service Master Key, which each Instance already has built-in. ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on April 20, 2010
  • Have you backed up your keys lately?

    Did you know that you already have a Server Master Key (SMK) generated for your system? That’s right – while a Database Master Key (DMK) is generated when you encrypt a certificate or Asymmetric Key with code, the Server Master Key is generated automatically when you start the Instance. So you should back all of those keys up periodically, and ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on March 1, 2010
  • SQL Server Best Practices: Use Roles When You Can

    SQL Server has two major security vectors: “Principals”, which are primarily users and roles (groups), and “Securables”, which are primarily objects on the server or in the database, like tables or views. Many applications use Logins for their users, and then tie those Instance Logins to Database Users. The Database Users are then given rights and ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on December 7, 2009
Powered by Community Server (Commercial Edition), by Telligent Systems
  Privacy Statement