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  • Java Resources for Windows Azure

    Windows Azure is a Platform as a Service – a PaaS – that runs code you write. That code doesn’t just mean the languages on the .NET platform – you can run code from multiple languages, including Java. In fact, you can develop for Windows and SQL Azure using not only Visual Studio but the Eclipse Integrated Development ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on March 12, 2012
  • Windows Azure Use Case: Web Applications

    This is one in a series of posts on when and where to use a distributed architecture design in your organization's computing needs. You can find the main post here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/buckwoody/archive/2011/01/18/windows-azure-and-sql-azure-use-cases.aspx  Description: Many applications have a requirement to be located outside of the ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on February 14, 2011
  • Windows Azure Emulators On Your Desktop

    Many people feel they have to set up a full Azure subscription online to try out and develop on Windows Azure. But you don’t have to do that right away. In fact, you can download the Windows Azure Compute Emulator – a “cloud development environment” – right on your desktop. No, it’s not for production use, and ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on February 1, 2011
  • The Proper Use of the VM Role in Windows Azure

    At the Professional Developer’s Conference (PDC) in 2010 we announced an addition to the Computational Roles in Windows Azure, called the VM Role. This new feature allows a great deal of control over the applications you write, but some have confused it with our full infrastructure offering in Windows Hyper-V. There is a proper architecture ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on December 28, 2010
  • Windows Azure Components

    In a previous post I explained an overview of the storage options you have for Windows Azure. I’d like to pull back a bit today – because Windows Azure is often used as a single term, you might not be aware it actually is composed of three components. These components work together, but can also be used separately.   Windows ...
    Posted to Buck Woody (Weblog) by BuckWoody on October 19, 2010
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