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  • Conquer Your Fear of Virtualization with a Free Day of Training at PASS!

    Click this link to register: http://www.houseofbrick.com/education/sqlserverbootcamp/Registration. Presented by my buddy, David Klee at House of Brick, one of the nations top VMWare consultancies specializing in Oracle and SQL Server deployments. David has a great write-up of this boot camp ...
    Posted to Kevin Kline (Weblog) by KKline on October 18, 2012
  • Timewarp: What Is a Relational Database?

    Relational?!? Move On, Geezer!Maybe you're thinking that relational databases management systems (RDBMSs), like Microsoft SQL Server and Oracle, are going the way of punched cards and rotary phones.  After all, there's been a lot of hype these days in the IT media about the rise of so-called NoSQL (Not Only SQL) databases. ...
    Posted to Kevin Kline (Weblog) by KKline on September 5, 2012
  • Build Your Own Microsoft Operations Manager Pack

    Operations Manager Management Pack Development KitI just recently told you about some cool new things happening with System Center - before I stumbled across this tidbit.  Hey, if I could, I'd go back in time and add this entry to the previous one --- yeah, and totally NOT play the stock market to make a fortune through time travel. ...
    Posted to Kevin Kline (Weblog) by KKline on May 3, 2012
  • Accelerate OLTP with HP and Microsoft's New High Performance Reference Architecture

    If you haven't started to read Shashank Pawar (blog), you're missing out. Shashank is part of Microsoft Australia and has been writing some very good content lately. Here's an example from the Reference Architecture for High Performance SQL Server:HP and Microsoft engineering teams have worked together to create a reference architecture to ...
    Posted to Kevin Kline (Weblog) by KKline on March 6, 2012
  • Microsoft Document Watch for Operational Excellence

    Back when my day-to-day duties included database administration work and enterprise architecture, I became rather obsessed with the idea of operational excellence. I read everything I could on the topic. I made a list of favorites, which became somewhat shabby over time, as I dog-eared important pages and scribbled notes in the margins. ...
    Posted to Kevin Kline (Weblog) by KKline on August 8, 2011
  • There are no sequential or random disk I/Os

    Okay, it’s a bit of a hyperbole. But let me elaborate. I regularly bump into SQL Server discussions, online or elsewhere, in which I hear people speaking with confidence that an operation is so and so because it is doing sequential disk I/Os or because it is doing random disk I/Os. That always makes me wonder how they know and how they can be so ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on April 1, 2011
  • Bad database practices: moving data to procedures vs. moving procedures to data

    Is it better to move data to procedures or move procedures to data?   The answer is, of course, “it depends.” Let’s consider a scenario where you have two SQL Server instances: ServerA and ServerB, and you have a procedure on ServerB (call it procB), but need to access data on ServerA.   Three database solutions are ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on October 30, 2009
  • The CAP Theorem

    I always like simple frameworks that help put some order into chaos.   Last month while in Seattle, I ran into something that for whatever reason had managed to escape my radar screen. If there was a single thing that made the trip to Seattle worthwhile, that was it.   I’m talking about the CAP Theorem. I'm blogging about it here ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on December 17, 2008
  • Is the 8KB page obsolete or aging?

      In one of their year 2000 papers—Rules of Thumb in Data Engineering, Jim Gray and Prashant Shenoy stated that, “Over the last decade, disk pages have grown from 2KB to 8KB and poised to grow again. In ten years, the typical small transfer unit will probably be 64KB, and large transfer units will be a megabyte or more.”   Should we ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on March 3, 2008
  • The End of an Architectural Era?

    Alan Cranfield on the SSWUG list alerted me to a paper by Mike Stonebraker and folks, proclaiming the end of the current relational database architecture that is generally embraced by all the major commercial relational DBMS and annoucing that a far better paradigm would be based on specialized engines. You can find the paper ...
    Posted to Linchi Shea (Weblog) by Linchi Shea on February 20, 2008
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