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Andy Leonard

Andy Leonard is CSO of Linchpin People and SQLPeople, an SSIS Trainer, Consultant, and developer; a Business Intelligence Markup Language (Biml) developer; SQL Server database and data warehouse developer, community mentor, engineer, and farmer. He is a co-author of SQL Server 2012 Integration Services Design Patterns. His background includes web application architecture and development, VB, and ASP. Andy loves the SQL Server Community!
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Installing SQL Server 2012 on Windows 2012 Server

In Want to Learn SQL Server 2012? I wrote about obtaining a fully-featured version of SQL Server 2012 (Developer Edition).

This post represents one way to install SQL Server 2012 Developer Edition on a Hyper-V virtual machine running the Windows 2012 Server Standard Edition operating system. This is by no means exhaustive. My goal in writing this is to help you get a default instance of SQL Server 2012 up and running. I do not cover setting up the Hyper-V virtual machine. I begin after loading the SQL Server 2012 Developer Edition ISO file into the VM’s CD/DVD drive.

Navigate to the installation drive folder. Right-click setup.exe and click “Run as administrator” as shown in Figure 1:

Figure1
Figure 1

This starts the SQL Server Installation Center. Click the Installation page from the list on the left side, and then click the top link (“New SQL Server stand-alone installation or add features to an existing installation”):

Figure2
Figure 2

Setup conducts eight checks for things that could interfere with a successful installation of SQL Server:

Figure3
Figure 3

Next, enter the product key. If you are installing SQL Server 2012 Developer Edition, the value appears for you on the screen shown in Figure 4:

Figure4
Figure 4

The next screen prompts you to accept the license terms. You can also opt to send anonymous feature usage data to Microsoft. I do this and recommend you do too. Why? Microsoft actually uses this data to qualify and prioritize future development efforts.

Figure5
Figure 5

Setup checks for conditions that may interfere with the installation of setup support files:

Figure6
Figure 6

You next select the setup role in the installation process. I like the option “All Features With Defaults,” as shown in Figure 7:

Figure7
Figure 7

When you select the “All Features With Defaults” option, the next screen – Feature Selection – is prepopulated, as shown in Figure 8:

Figure8
Figure 8

Setup next checks installation rules:

Figure9
Figure 9

Figure 10 shows the next step in the process, SQL Server instance configuration:

Figure10
Figure 10

Disk space calculations are next…

Figure11
Figure 11

… followed by service account configuration:

Figure12
Figure 12

Database engine configuration includes Authentication Mode and SQL Server Administrators. You can accept the defaults if you want. I use Mixed Mode Authentication (combined with very strong passwords) for my installations. Clicking the Add Current User button adds me to the SQL Server administrators, as shown in Figure 13:

Figure13
Figure 13

Analysis Services setup is next. Although Figure 14 does not show it, I mostly work with Tabular Model these days. As before, I click the Add Current User button to add this account to the Administrators:

Figure14
Figure 14

Accept the defaults for Reporting Services configuration as shown in Figure 15:

Figure15
Figure 15

I haven’t used the Distributed Replay Client (DRC) yet, but it is on my list of SQL Server 2012 stuff to learn. I click the Add Current User button:

Figure16
Figure 16

Give the DRC a name similar to the server name, as shown in Figure 17:

Figure17
Figure 17

Select Error Reporting options as shown in Figure 18:

Figure18
Figure 18

Installation configuration rules are checked for consistency and readiness, shown in Figure 19:

Figure19
Figure 19

Figure 20 confirms the installation is ready to begin:

Figure20
Figure 20

When the installation is complete, the Complete window displays as shown in Figure 21:

Figure21
Figure 21

A bunch of new cool tiles appear on your Windows 2012 Server start page, as shown in Figure 22:

Figure22
Figure 22

And you are done! Installation is complete and you are ready to begin exploring SQL Server 2012!

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Published Sunday, October 28, 2012 2:00 PM by andyleonard

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Jim said:

If nothing else the final shows why the "interface formerly known as Metro" doesn't suit a server O/S.

October 28, 2012 6:11 PM
 

Greg Low said:

Hey Andy,

Would love to hear your thoughts on the desktop tiles on servers. Thumbs up or down?

October 28, 2012 6:47 PM
 

andyleonard said:

Hi Greg and Jim,

  I don't know yet about the Metro-style tiles. All I can say for now is "They are different." I haven't yet formed an opinion about their usefulness, but I haven't really had time, yet.

:{>

October 28, 2012 9:39 PM
 

Chris R. Chapman said:

Having just done a production installation of SQL2012 on a Win2012 server, I can wholeheartedly concur with the annoyance of the Metro UI. It's going to cause some pain for infrastructure folks for some time - we're all going to need to get used to hitting the Windows logo key and typing what we're looking for and hoping it appears.

October 29, 2012 10:22 AM
 

Steve R said:

Quick find over the weekend, right click tile, e.g. SSMS tile and select/click on bottom the "Open File location" and it will take you to what you would see "as shortcuts" in the old start>-programs-> etc...

October 29, 2012 2:24 PM
 

pwehland said:

Distributed Replay seems to be a tool that came out of the test group and was put into the product late in the game without a lot of thought or testing.  The setup is incomplete and buggy, you need to spend hours debugging it until you understand that setup installs it wrong.  It needs more work and is NOT ready for the mainstream.

October 30, 2012 5:21 AM
 

Ian Yates said:

I've got a few Windwows Server 2012 VMs and physical boxes around the place now.  I reckon I've looked at the start screen maybe 5 times total - it just hasn't been a big deal.

The only server where I've used it was a terminal server I set up on which I deliberately turned on desktop experience, etc :)

My habits may not be like other users, but I've always hit the Win key on the keyboard and just typed to get what I want.  That, or I did Win+R and typed ssms, winword, devenv, cmd, http://www.*.com, etc  to get what I wanted.  Mousing around and pecking through the XP/Vista/7 start menu drives me nuts.  I have organised a few tiles on the "metro" start screen for desktop apps and it's working pretty well although it's effort to get right.

You can also run "Classic Shell" - it's free and brings back a version of the start menu.  I run it on Win 7 and disable all of its classic shell stuff except for bringing back the display of the security zone in Internet Explorer - it's nice to know if the site I'm looking at was correctly recognised as local intranet, internet or trusted.

My 2c :)

October 31, 2012 2:05 AM

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