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Andy Leonard

Andy Leonard is CSO of Linchpin People and SQLPeople, an SSIS Trainer, Consultant, and developer; a Business Intelligence Markup Language (Biml) developer; SQL Server database and data warehouse developer, community mentor, engineer, and farmer. He is a co-author of SQL Server 2012 Integration Services Design Patterns. His background includes web application architecture and development, VB, and ASP. Andy loves the SQL Server Community!
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Microsoft and Open Source: This Changes Things

There was a pretty big announcement from Microsoft yesterday: Microsoft Makes Strategic Changes in Technology and Business Practices to Expand Interoperability.

To quote Steve Ballmer:

Number one, we're committing to ensure open connections for our high volume products. Number two, we're committing to promote data portability for our high volume products. Number three, we're committing to enhancing Microsoft's support for industry standards. And four, we're committing to fostering a more open engagement with industry, as well as the open source software community.

Andy's Guestimate du jour: This will likely impact database development. I'm interested in your thoughts: What do you think?

:{> Andy

Published Friday, February 22, 2008 12:55 PM by andyleonard

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Jamie Thomson said:

Whilst I'm sure there are going to be impacts to the likes of you and me, I'm failing to see what they are.

1. "we're committing to ensure open connections for our high volume products".

As far as I know there are technologies available that enable virtually any other development technology to interact with SQL Server (e.g. OLE DB)

2. "we're committing to promote data portability for our high volume products"

To me, data portability means "moving data from one place to another". I don't see anything in SQL Server that prohibits that.

3. "we're committing to enhancing Microsoft's support for industry standards"

ANSI SQL? I thought T-SQL supported it pretty well. Admittedly there are extensions are the DB purists may moan about that, but by-and-large I don't see SQL Server doing anything wrong here. Are there industry standards around ETL? OLAP? Data mining? Data queuing? The only one I can think of that comes close is MDX and Microsoft invented that (didn't they?).

4. "we're committing to fostering a more open engagement with industry, as well as the open source software community"

To be fair there do need to be improvements here. And that has already begun with the recent release of something that supports SQL Server integration with PHP.

I'm sure I'm being totally naive but I don't see how this is going to affect us.

-Jamie

February 22, 2008 12:39 PM
 

Denis Gobo said:

I think this has been done to please the EU more than anything else (after all the YHOO deal won't go through if they don't approve it either)

This doesn't affect SQL people, web developers who have to hack code for IE, shops that use mixed environments with Linux, Mac and Windows will benefit from this mostly

February 22, 2008 12:46 PM

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